EYE-TRACKING ON GENERIC SURFACES
WITH ONE-OFF CALIBRATION

GAZE TRACKING ON DISPLAYS, WALLS, CINEMA SCREENS, BILLBOARDS, WINDSCREENS, ARTWORK ETC...

RISEBETA Eye-Tracker

One-off Calibration - Designed for Research

Traditional eye-tracking systems require repeated calibration and often force users to remain motionless. RISEBETA requires a one-off user calibration and allows users to move freely within the camera's field of view. Built specifically for research, RISEBETA can track gaze over display screens and generic surfaces such as walls, cinema screens, vehicle windscreens, art exhibits, digital-out-of-home displays etc.

What it can do?

Allows researchers to use zoom lenses for distance gaze-tracking while allowing users to move freely

Single Calibration

Repeated user calibrations are not required. User calibration is performed once during installation and is is valid until hardware setup changes.

Precision

Allows freedom of movement within the camera's field-of-view with the same level of accuracy as other commercial eye-trackers

Generic Surface

Can be configured to track gaze over generic surface such as a vehicle windscreen, art-work or cinema screen.

Product Features

Eye-tracking system flexible enough for gaze-based research

RISE (BETA) Eye-Tracker

  1. Track Generic Surfaces
    The Calibration Utility allows researchers to configure RISEBETA to track gaze over generic surfaces such as walls, cinema screens, art exhibits, vehicle windscreens etc.
  2. Freedom of Movement
    Unlike most commercial eye-trackers, our algorithm allows for freedom of movement within an imaginary 'track-box' inside the camera's field of view. Users can come and go as they please without effecting gaze-tracking performance.
  3. Open Hardware Architecture
    The Calibration Utility allows researchers to configure RISEBETA for use with different camera positions and orientations, different lens types and focal lengths, and different positions and orientations of the tracking surface.

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our blog

  • 02Dec
    Blind Eye-Tracking Studies
    One of the main sources of bias in eye-tracking studies comes from the Hawthorne Effect - the tendency for respondents to change their behavior because they know they are being studied. If respondents knows their eyes are being tracked, then they often cannot help but change their gaze behavior. RISEBETA…

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